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November 2017

A Tale of Two Corps Commanders: Hill and McCook at Chickamauga

November 16 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm

Daniel Harvey Hill and Alexander McD. McCook had their Civil War careers badly tarnished because of Chickamauga. McCook commanded the Union XX Corps, which was routed off the battlefield on September 20 1863. Hill and Confederate army commander Braxton Bragg had such a bitter falling-out that Hill was relieved of command a month later. Both men also had long careers after the war’s end – Hill as a writer, editor, and educator; McCook as a professional soldier. This talk explores…

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David A. Powell, Chicago, IL: A Tale of Two Corps Commanders: D. H. Hill and A. M. McCook at Chickamauga.

November 16 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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Daniel Harvey Hill and Alexander McD. McCook had their Civil War careers badly tarnished because of their performance at the September 20, 1863 Battle of Chickamauga. McCook, commander the Union XX Corps, was routed off the battlefield, and Confederate corps commander Hill had such a falling out with army commander Braxton Bragg, that Bragg relieved Hill of command a month later. Nevertheless, both men had long and distinguished careers after the war's end. Hill became a writer, editor, and educator and McCook a professional soldier. This talk explores each man's role in the epic battle of Chickamauga and the fascinating story of their postwar lives.

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October 2017

John P. Slough, the 1st Colorado,& Glorieta Pass

October 19 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
Cincinnati Civil War Round Table, Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Rd
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States

John Potts Slough, a Cincinnati native, was colonel of the 1st Colorado Volunteer Infantry. Richard Miller’s talk will focus on Slough’s efforts to organize, train, and lead the hard-drinking and free-spirited Colorado volunteers to their victory at Glorieta Pass in March of 1862. Shortly after the battle, Slough abruptly resigned his command, claiming that he feared for his life from his own men. Dick will discuss Slough’s disastrous relationship with the 1st Colorado, the relationship’s impact on the Colorado Volunteers’…

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September 2017

Erick Bush, Rome, NY: Selma: Alabama’s Civil War Arsenal City

September 21 @ 7:15 pm - 9:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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No Longer Accepting Dinner Reservations for this Event
Selma was transformed into the Confederacy’s second most important war manufacturing center, outside of Richmond. Essential to the Confederate war effort, especially with the construction of the CSS Tennessee ironclad and the Brooke cannon, Selma provided critical support to Confederate operations in the field, in places including Mobile, Charleston, and Atlanta. An impressive network of ironworks was developed in Alabama to supply the sprawling Selma Arsenal, Ordnance Works, and Navy Yard. A series of well engineered earthworks and fortifications were constructed around Selma to defend this critical industrial center. As a testament to the importance of Selma, it produced “half of the cannon and two thirds of the fixed ammunition” for the Confederacy in 1864-1865. The largest cavalry raid of the Civil War, under the command of Major General James H. Wilson, targeted and destroyed Selma during the final stages of the Civil War.

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May 2017

Phillip Greenwalt, Everglades NP: Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864

May 18 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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The Shenandoah Valley was considered the breadbasket of the Confederacy and was used as the Army of Northern Virginia avenue of invasion as it advanced towards Gettysburg in 1863. Now in the summer of 1864 Union General-in-Chief Ulysses S. Grant ordered Phil Sheridan sweep the Shenandoah Valley “clean and clear". To lose the valley would mean to lose the state, Stonewall Jackson had once said. That prediction would be put to the test as Sheridan fought with Jubal Early for possession. Historian Phillip Greenwalt will discuss the Shenandoah Valley battles of 1864 and the campaign that ultimately determined the balance of power across the Eastern Theater.

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April 2017

Carleton Young, Pittsburgh, PA: Voices From the Attic: The Williamstown Boys in the Civil War

April 20 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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Imagine clearing out your family attic and finding an old wooden box jammed with hundreds of letters written during the Civil War. You soon discover they are written by two brothers serving in the First Vermont Brigade of the Union Army. The letters offer an eye witness description of the battles of the Peninsula Campaign, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Cedar Creek as well as an in-depth account of regular army life. Using the letters, Carleton Young and few other researchers were able to weave together their dramatic war-time narrative into a book entitled Voices From the Attic: The Wiiliamstown boys in the Civil War.

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March 2017

William “Jack” C. Davis, Virginia Tech University: The Confederate Kardashian: Loreta Janeta Velasquez and the Invention of Confederate Celebrity

March 16 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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In her bestselling memoir, The Woman in Battle, Loreta Janeta Velasquez claimed to have posed as a man to fight for the Confederacy, but in fact she never saw combat. Always a sensational press favorite, Velasquez displayed throughout her life an uncanny ability to manipulate popular media and to benefit from her fame in a way that prefigured celebrities of our own time. After the Civil War ended, she created a phony mining company, coned North Carolina residents to back her financially in a fake immigration scheme, and attracted investors to build a railroad across western Mexico. Velasquez was one of the first women to venture into journalism and presidential politics. In Inventing Loreta Velasquez, acclaimed historian William C. Davis delves into the life of one of America’s early celebrities, peeling back the myths she herself created to reveal a startling and even more implausible reality.

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February 2017

Mark Lause, University of Cincinnati: Sterling Price and the 1864 Missouri Campaign

February 16 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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As the Civil War was drawing to a close, former Missouri governor Sterling Price led his army on one last desperate campaign to retake his home state for the Confederacy, part of a broader effort to tilt the upcoming 1864 Union elections against Abraham Lincoln and the Republicans. In The Collapse of Price’s Raid: The Beginning of the End in Civil War Missouri, Mark A. Lause examines the complex political and social context of what became known as “Price’s Raid,” the final significant Southern operation west of the Mississippi River.

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January 2017

Theresa Leininger-Miller, Ph.D, University of Cincinnati: Illustrated Sheet Music of the Civil War

January 19 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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Before the invention of the phonograph, music was primarily disseminated by way of printed sheet music. To make sheet music more marketable, publishers hired artists to design attractive patriotic covers. Theresa Leininger-Miller will share with us her study of illustrated sheet music published during and just after the Civil War. These gems of popular culture will be examined for both their artistic merit and historical significance.

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November 2016

David Dixon, Santa Barbara, CA: Charles Anderson and the Lost Gettysburg Address

November 17, 2016 @ 7:15 pm - 8:45 pm
West Pavilion at Drake Center, 151 West Galbraith Road
Cincinnati, OH 45216 United States
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Few remember Edward Everett's oration that preceded Lincoln's masterpiece, but hardly anyone is aware Charles Anderson's oration, which concluded the day's events. Anderson was raised on a Louisville slaveholding plantation, graduated from Miami University in 1833, lived in Dayton, Ohio for twelve years then Cincinnati for the next 13 years. In 1844, Anderson was elected to the Ohio Senate and made a name for himself in opposing Ohio’s Black Laws. After moving to Texas in 1859 for health reasons, he…

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